« Chemical Liability and 'Toxic Lockouts' | Main | The Corporate Climate Juggernaut »

February 16, 2007

Comments

Abendigo Reebs

One point I'm confused about on cleantech is the fact that it's an asset class and doesn't represent the actual tech ('green technology')in which the industry invests (Wikipedia). Yet there are some, for example, the people over at www.green-technology.org, who clearly state on their website that green technology is also known as clean technology. Would you define in the broader sense, Joel, or do you think of it in more of the former, specific sense?

Minerva Perez

What water conservation practices. What is being done?
Minerva Bernal Perez
mperez2@gvtc.com

robert veach

Look at this commercial about solar from a company called SALON. I do not know if they are still in buisiness,but after you see it, check out this companys new solution:
www.jointhesolution.com/yorkville.
Joel, if this is spamming, please let me know and I will stop. I feel compelled to get this message out!

robert veach

Look at this commercial about solar from a company called SALON. I do not know if they are still in buisiness,but after you see it, check out this companys new solution:
www.jointhesolution.com/yorkville.
Joel, if this is spamming, please let me know and I will stop. I feel compelled to get this message out!

robert veach

(sorry about two of them, sytsem locked up and sent out comment twice)

Edwin Stafford

Regarding the term "cleantech," I too have noticed some varied use with regard to its definition. Is it merely a classification of assets for investments or actual "green technologies"? Given that cleantech is a relatively new term, I guess the fuzziness of the definition is not unexpected, and perhaps useful for people to discuss and debate the scope of "cleantech." In my mind, it is a good term to use in place of "green technology" because the term "green" can often times convey a negative image in business. When I discuss "green buildings" with general business audiences or students, I prefer to use the term "high performance buildings" to get away from the Gilligan's Island image of bamboo huts for people unfamiliar with the idea of green, energy-efficient buildings and to convey the practical benefits of green.

My colleagues and I published an article in the journal Environment last year where we included a sidebar on forces driving "the age of cleantech." In our context, we used the term to describe a broad assortment of energy- and resource-efficient, higher-performance technologies and products that are becoming mainstream.

http://www.greenmarketing.com/articles/Stafford-MyopiaJune06.pdf

The comments to this entry are closed.