« The 100 "Most Sustainable Companies," 2006 Edition | Main | Sustainable Business and the World Economic Forum »

February 04, 2006

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451581369e200d83471d4d053ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference In Search of the 'Flex-Fuel Freeway':

Comments

Bob from ALAMN

The 'Flex Fuel Highway" has already been built. It's in Minnesota. Today, you can drive to almost anywhere in the state and be within a tankful of the next E85 station. There are nearly 200, all open to the public.

See details at this website:

www.cleanairchoice.org

Matteo

I'm not a technician, but here is what I think.
In the next future sustainable mobility should be achieve through biomass derived combustibles, and high efficiency vehicles. I don't know which is better between E85 and biodiesel, but I think we should prefer the one that grant agriculture diversification without compromise food supplying, and close loop production, through waste utilization. Probably we'll have different combustibles in a certain mix, depending also by local availability and situations. Regarding to the technology, hybrid systems and research in so-called hyper cars seem to be the most promising way in the next future. The combination of research in alternative fuels and more efficient technology will be the solution. The new hybrid diesel car from Peugeot Citroën, 69 mpg, is a good example, because it could be combined with biodiesel (http://www.greencarcongress.com/2006/01/psa_peugeot_cit.html).

Felix Kramer

The enthusiasm for ethanol and "flex-fuel" cars using E85, which is 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline is welcome. But it works best if we use plug-in hybrids to power most of our miles electrically. Otherwise we'll need more ethanol than we can make sustainably. How about a combination solution: increasingly renewable electricity as the primary fuel and ethanol as the range extender. That's the solution offered by the flex-fuel plug-in hybrid, which is why so many people are starting to talk about 100+MPG hybrids eventually becoming 500 MPG (of gasoline, plus electricity plus ethanol) vehicles. -- Felix Kramer, Founder, CalCars.org

parag

hello sir!!
im an engg studient .
i want to know more about hyper cars!!!
can u plz tell me or send me information about this plz plz!!!!

Ryan

I have a network in place for this highway as well as a supplier and many more to follow to blanket the US as well as making it sustaianable. We can make it sustainable for and continue to provide the people with the power to control our fuel!!

The comments to this entry are closed.